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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
of the stricken reactor is at the fukushima plant. radiation continues to spread from the site. u.s. engineers and others are explaining their options of containing the leak. >> in the small village 40 kilometers northeast of fukushima, while outside detroit exclusion zone, the people living here thought they were safe -- northeast of fukushima, well east -- outside of the exclusion zone. >> this has exceeded the data. >> the latest news from fukushima also offers no grounds for optimism. yvette tb's do not know when or even if they will be able to return home -- in evacuees -- the evacuees do not know. >> we do not know when the situation will normalize, and we do not think there will be a future for us in the city. >> operator tepco has decided to decommission four of the reactors. filling them up may be necessary. >> government and experts are considering but these four buildings at the fukushima-dai- ichi plant to stop the spread of the substances. >> a they will spray it with a synthetic resin to try to prevent radioactive dust from being blown away or being watched to see. in a refugee c
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
is recinding his offer to step down by year's end. this as opposition to his regime testifies. they are a key u.s. ally in the fight against al-qaida warns his country is a ticking time bomb that could spiral into civil war without him. a deadly bullet blast killed more than a hundred people. today security forces reportedly fired teargas on some 4,000 demonstrators. in a bid to ease the crisis syrian's president is expected to lift the nearly 50-year state of emergency and move to lift restrictions on civil liberties. the country's emergency laws that gave police almost unlimited power to arrest without arpblgs will be lifted prior to the elections in september. this comes as the interim military rulers says hosni mubarak is under house arrest in egypt. this half he went for medical treatment. gregg: it has been ten days since the military mission began, and the president expected to tell the nation the mission is justified. white house correspondent mike emanuel live in washington with more on that. what else do we know about the case that president obama is going to make tonight? >> reporter:
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
this country ask, why is the u.s. part of this operation? his own defense secretary telling abc news today this is not a vital national interest. so, as the president prepares to address the nation tomorrow, can he convince americans that the u.s. should be involved in this operation? as the u.s. hands over power to nato, what is the end game for american forces? and will there be a deal for gadhafi to get him out? david kerley leads us off at the white house tonight. david? >> reporter: good evening, david. the administration attacked the air waves today, making its case a week into the bombing of libya, a day before the president's big speech. and even the president's own defense secretary admitted on abc's "this week" that libya did not pose a threat. >> do you think libya posed an actual imminent threat to the united states? >> no, no. it was not -- it was not a vital national interest to the united states. but it was an interest. >> reporter: an interest, gates says, because gadhafi threatened to slaughter his own people. facing congressional and public criticism, the president in his
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
can convey a message to the american people why it is consistent with u.s. foreign policy goals? >> i do. we have to keep in mind the uprise negligent middle east - uprising in the middle east lends to developments. in the short run we can't controll the events completely. this is important in the middle east and to abanon the people of libya would have let qaddafi slaughtter his own people and put a damper on the efforts of the youngg people in the middle east and small democrats and those who want to liberalize those societies there. >> even with nato in command, are you concerned that ultimately the pressure will be on the u.s. if qaddafi fights for months? >> i am opposed to putting our own soldiers on the ground. i believe that the coalition that is in place led by nato and not the united states will find the right balance of approaches to support the people in libya and to see that there is a new regime in place and support the spirit of revolution and spirit of change and democratic societies in the middle east . so we have to watch this, and congress has a role to play in advi
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
to libya, gene cretz talking to the opposition chief. >> >> a u.s. officials confirmed the authenticity of the call, but would not comment on the query about weapons. hillary clinton is speaking to the opposition, too. >> we are reaching out to the opposition inside and outside of libya. i will be meeting with some of those figures both here in the united states and when i travel next week to discuss what more the united states and others can do. >> reporter: but moammar gadhafi and is spokesman's son show no signs of caving into pressure. >> the libyan peet will never, ever welcome nato, will never, ever welcome americans here. libya is not a piece of cake. we are n-- >> this is a kind of stalemate back and forth, but i think longer term, that the regime will prevail. >> jill dougherty reporting for us from the state department. we'll have a lot more on what general clapper, head of the national -- director of national intelligence had to say. this note, though, i have been invited to travel with secretary clinton on her overseas trip next week. i'll be reporting on critical talks abou
, but despite eight days of bombing the u.s. says military ground forces loyal to president gadhafi still pose a significant threat. on monday, president obama will address the nation on the libyan crisis. >>> disaster in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days, and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in
in the program. moving on to libya, a country where our u.s. military is now involved in coalition air strikes helping to turn the tide in one city. rebels able to gain control of ajdabiya. the fight, a pierce one and bodies of more than a dozen men loyal to qaddafi scattered among the burned out artillery. troops were forced to retreat to the west. the rebels promise to march toward tripoli. steve, under the cover of the allied air strikes victory for the rebels. >>reporter: harris, this is a major turn around for the rebel force that is being formed and growing. they retreated for two weeks before this . now with the allied air strikes they were able to come out and launch an assault and take a town they had fled from. ajdabiya was a ghost town and it was the allied air strikes that were key. they targeted tanks and vehicles and supply lines . soldier running out of fuel and food were forced to retreat in the end. >> could we see this repeat in other cities? >> that's what the rebels are hoping for and asking for. a battle is shaping up in miraheta and once again ally airlines are pounding q
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
john mccain wants the u.s. and others to arm the rebels. he says the president needs to clarify the purpose, the costs and duration of the operation. >> this policy has been characterized by confusion and indecision and delay. it is no wonder that americans are confused as to what our policy is. on the one hand, they say it is humanitarian and the other hand they say gadhafi must go. >> president obama will speak on the libyan mission tonight. he will speak from the national defense university in washington. we get started at 7:00 p.m. eastern. 4:00 out west. >>> in london, british prime minister david cameron is making a statement on the libyan opposition. he is organizing for a transition process. a conference will be held in london tomorrow. it is designed to outline the political framework for the way ahead in libya. >>> now the syrian government may bow to protesters and demands analyst the emergency law that has been in place for 50 years now. the president is expected to address the nation soon and dozens of protesters have been killed since demonstrations began just nine
gadhafi's hometown. president obama prepares to explain his decision to involve the u.s. military in libya during an address to the nation tonight. >>> in a disturbing case, the 55 billionaire air to the s.c. johnson fortune charged with sexually abusing a child for years. the alleged victim, his now 15-year-old stepdaughter. >>> and princely party. harry threw his brother a bachelor party over the weekend but a hitch in the plans forced a last-minute change. we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal wedding today, march 28, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. nice to be back. >> it's been a while. >> it has. i went to london to vicsit the queen. she wouldn't answer the door though. but president obama is going to face criticism. membe members of both parties have expressed concerns about the goal of the mission and how long our forces will be in libya. we'll have more straight ahead. >> also, did
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
for gadhafi, to get him into exile. well get into that with the u.s. bourd to the united nations, susan rice. >>> first, we go to jake tapper at the white house. >> reporter: good morning, george. the president said a confluence of events compelled the u.s. to act to stop a massacre. a moral and a strategic case to act. and broad support for reaction throughout the world. but, george, that did not stop the president's critics. the president said they were a special set of circumstances. >> the united states has worked with our international partners to mobilize a broad coalition, secure an international mandate to protect civilians, stop an advancing army, prevent a massacre and establish a no-fly zone. >> reporter: also clearly informing his decision were lessons from two previous presidents. why would the u.s. not militarily seek regime change in libya? >> to be blunt, we went down that road in iraq. >> reporter: but also the responsibility to prevent a massacre, as did not happen in the former yugoslavia during bill clinton's tenure in 1995. >> as president, i refuse to wait for images of
community to intervene to "stop the massacres." more now, from theodore kattouf. he served as u.s. ambassador to he served as u.s. ambassador to syria from 2001 to 2003, part of a 31-year career in the foreign service, most of it in the middle east. and ammar abdulhamid is a liberal democracy activist whose anti-regime activities led to his exile from syria in 2005. he now lives in the u.s. and writes the blog "syria revolution digest." welcome to both of you. the reports are, ammar is that this started with the arrest of some teenagers in the town, some anti-regime graffiti. it has clearly group. how has it group, what is involved now. >> what you have to realize is the seeds of this revolution has been planted years ago. what you are talking about syria with the arrest of the children, we are talking about the immediate cause. but people got an idea that the times were suitable for a revolution, finally, when of course tunisia was made and managed to topple their regime and egyptians and we saw immediately how the spark really, or the wave of protests took ever o the region. a l
the country on u.s. action with libya with critics on both sides of the aisle hammering about the plan. what does he need to say? a former presidential speech write are is here next. >> dave: getting bang for their buck. radio shack, make ago unusual offer. buy satellite tv, get a gun. good idea? we report you decide. >> clayton: sometimes you want to shoot your tv. your cable. introducing the thunderbolt by htc. immense power. scorching speed. the first phone strong enough to run on the fastest, most advanced 4g network in america. the two trains and a bus rider. the "i'll sleep when it's done" academic. for 80 years, we've been inspireby you. and we've been honored to walk with you to help you get where u want to be. ♪ because your moment is now. let nothing stand in your way. ♪ [ giggles ] let nohey, max.nd in your way. [ announcer ] you can help significantly extend your dog's healthy years. a groundbreaking 14-year study by purina... proves that puppy chow, then dog chow nutrition, fed properly over a lifetime, can help extend his lovable antics up to 1.8 healthy years. long live yo
even though libya is not vital to u.s. interests? that's the question. joining us now, dick morris, former advisor to president clinton and the author of the new book "revolt." all right. that's the question for you. >> well, i think that -- i wrote this in a column on my web site dickmorris.com. this guy is playing checkers when he should be playing chess. he's moving the pieces one at a time without thinking five moves down the road. so ok, we're intervening from the air to protect civilians from mass slaughter. all right, that's good right now. now, what happens if we can't get rid of qaddafi and he continues to slaughter the people? you're going to send in ground troops or just say, ok, now we'll turn a blind eye. let's say we get rid of qaddafi and then an iraq style civil war breaks out where his cronies and political party goes underground challenging the rebels with ongoing terrorist tactics like happened in iraq. are we going to turn a blind eye to that? at what point do you disengage. at what point do the libyan rebels take over and turn out to be heavily infiltrated by a
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)